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History of Maida(White Flour) - All purpose flour and health hazards



All of us know the history of Maida. We also know why Maida was first used. Let me start my answer with a little explanation, though.


Due to the shortage of wheat during the Second World War, food made by Maida flour became widely spread in Tamil Nadu.Some of the wastes of wheat and flour of the cassava tuber are used for making the maida that time. Even today, When the wheat is not wid
ely available, cassava flour and some chemicals used for making the maida. The Paratha made using Maida flour became very popular.

One of the main reasons for the popularity of Paratha was the easily available, taste, and the way it was made.Particularly it becomes popularity among women, as they can't make the perfect at home and easy to buy them when the food is not cooked.

The kurma (the salna) served with paratha taste, sticks in the tongue when the parotta is eaten with it. That is why we cannot leave eating paratha. Sowe are easily addicted to it.

We make a wide variety of food products through raw material, Maida. For examplecakes made on our birthdays are made by Maida.

How is Maida made?

Finely ground wheat flour will be in slight yellow in color. It is bleached with a chemical called benzoyl peroxide. This is called Maida.

Benzoyl peroxide is a chemical, and we have in our hair dye. This chemical along with the protein is one of the most important causes of diabetes.

Alloxan is also used to smooth the flour to make soften dough. This Alloxan is used to create diabetes in rats in the labs.

Maida has no fiber. Food which does not have fiber will reduce our digestive power. So the things made in Maida are not suitable for our body. They can also cause digestive problems.

There are no significant health benefits or vitamins in maida. So this is not going to benefit the children growth. Therefore, it is best to avoid food items made with maida for the kids. Especially cakesbiscuits, bakery items.

Biscuits made with maida slow down children's appetite. If you trust, eat four biscuits equals to one cup of milk as shown in the ad, then child's condition is awful.

Countries such as the European Union, London and China have banned the sale of Maida-made goods. RecentlyKerala state in India also started raising awareness about Maida products.

When we eat things made of maida, there is a risk of diseases such as kidney stones, heart disease and diabetes.

India is the biggest business market for commercial companies. We are all just a consumer like goats, who believe in what they say in the ad and eat.

There are many government departments for food products in all the countries. They can take care of making awareness and ban these kinds of products, perhaps they understand that we are human beings.

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authorHello, I am Samyraj, a software engineer. In my native village, they call me Samy.
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